‘Tyyni’ – Cucina Povera (Night School)

Artwork for 'Tyyni' - the latest release from Finnish sound artist Cucina Povera.

Slightly late to the party on this one (released March 27th) but stumbling across Finnish born sound artist Cucina Povera (aka Maria Rossi) and her latest album Tyyni was one of my favourite discoveries to date. Following previous releases; Zoom in 2019 and Hilja in 2018, Tyyni pushes Rossi to a more studio-based experimental sound.

The record begins with ‘Salvia Salvatrix’, where Rossi’s voice sets an almost sacred tone. Powerful, warped synths lay place as a somewhat distorted backdrop – the chaos ensuing whilst spoken word remains calm and unnerved. In ‘Anarkian kuvajainen’, Rossi’s vocals begin as an instrument, complementing a droning synth and glitchy mobile phone transmissions. As the track progresses, a dream like verse is introduced, which allows the listener to slowly drift to an almost meditative state..

‘Teerenpeli’ is possibly the most ‘modern’ sounding track – a minimalist-style tribal drum loop is present throughout and sampled recordings (simulating trickling water, crickets, thunder claps and echoing bird calls) glue the composition together with a naturistic undertone. Side A finishes with ‘Varjokuvatanssi’ – all instruments are stripped away and a haunting monologue is partnered only by quiet spoken-word background murmurs.

‘Polyton Nurkka’s’ distorted synth and heavy kick juxtapose gentle keys and Rossi’s melodic vocals, and in ‘Haaksirikkoutunut’, the record shifts again to a more abstract place, where structure makes way for sporadic drum pads, peppered with a manner of different samples and recordings. 

‘Saniaiset’ allows Rossi’s voice to be pushed to the foreground once more, with half-spoken and half-sung lyrics intertwined to the backdrop of a church bell-esque ringing synth, to stunning effect. Rounding things off with ‘Jolkottelureitti’, scaled synths sweep throughout the 8-minute track, whilst Rossi grants the listener one last show of her beautiful vocal range.

Not normally one for picking a favourite track, but the opener ‘Salvia Salvatrix’ really stood out for me. It’s where Rossi’s stunning vocal range is possibly most highlighted.  

Further reading (and discography) can be found here, whilst a mix recorded by Rossi for alternative music store Bleep, is also well worth a listen.